“Lack of Proper Funding in Schools”

Sofia Gongora, Staff Writer

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Out of all of the major issues facing American education today, one of the most dire issues is the lack of proper funding in public schools. This is a big problem to areas with high rates of poverty.  Students in these areas tend to suffer from lack of resources at home.  

  The economic state that kids and their families are in has a big effect on the children’s education, even in a country that promotes equal opportunity and fair treatment of all. Funding to low-income Title I schools has decreased since 2010 and a number of states have cut pre-K educational per student funding in recent years, and many have had to reduce enrollment numbers. Property taxes pay much of public education costs, even though they’re still low.  Making the problem even bigger is the fact that while states have been told to decrease spending, they have not been trying to raise any money or budgeting in the right places. 

Richard Fleming, who is in his 11th year as superintendent of the district says, “Over the last couple of years, we’ve had to cut several positions that we really need. You have to understand Greene County. We’re a very rural county with a small tax base, almost none. The money we get from the state is money we depend on for our children. Any time the state funding is cut in any way, it probably affects districts like ours more so than some of the larger districts that are in places where they have money coming in from their business.” This just shows how unfair the system is.  

Not only do schools not get enough funding, but most of them also budget in the wrong way. This affects the students and their learning. A lot of the schools spend a majority of their money on the football team, on newer computers, or even on cosmetic things. However, the money could be used in other places like going on educational field trips, ACT practice or classes, or even programs and clubs that enhances student learning. If schools would fund things other than sports, like learning clubs, then students probably would want to learn and succeed more. It takes effort on both sides.